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zhc

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Very well put. Unless you are a 30 year chiller man e ack. Have done too much in two many situations. This one is very simple. Staging area is where this needs to happen. Like above,,, I would not discuss this with any one cause they are going to cry fowl ball. What they don't understand, they think to their demise.
I agree with this on so many levels!
 
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fumanchu182

fumanchu182

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Thread Starter #222
I think you misunderstand the purpose of various bypasses that come with these chiller systems.

The first type of bypass blocks the flow of freon going to (or from) the factory evap core. This does two things. One, all of the freon will be dedicated to the chiller core which generally makes it more effective. Two, the major source of water when the A/C is running is from the factory evap core condensing water from air. By blocking flow to the factory evap core, it will no longer do that. You will still get condensation though, but it generally won't be from any of the a/c components nor will it be from the chiller because that unit comes insulated by all three major manufacturers of chiller units. Condensation will be from the coolant lines getting cold and condensing against the air, worst when dew point (humidity) is high. You can mitigate this by insulating all your coolant lines as well as parts of the a/c suction line as this can get cold as well. Note, the same thing happens with ice tanks. It's like pulling a cold soda can out of the fridge and leaving it outside.

The 2nd type of bypass is one that can divert flow around the factory heat exchangers. The reason why you would want to bypass the factory heat exchangers is a chiller can chill the coolant down well below ambient. When that happens, the factory HX work against it by introducing heat back into the fluid from ambient air. It becomes a reverse heat exchanger at that point.

In either case, the A/C has to be running pretty much 100% of the time for the chiller to do its thing while you're in the staging lanes waiting your turn. If it's all setup right, it won't drip on the track. I know I don't and I've been using a chiller or two for several years and have never had an issue with water on the track. However, I wouldn't go around telling everyone you're running your a/c for a chiller. They probably won't understand which can lead to complications with track officials.
100% makes sense, and yeah, not telling a single track official anything lol. @Mean Cat , i'mma need your address to where to send the case of beer in exchange for detailed pics of how you insulated things... .😂

Dependon the tempt, insulation of the refrig tubing, and redirect the moisture, if any, to am other resivor. I do it at home. Redirect my condensate from the a/c to a rain barrel on a pump and feeds my plants and lawn. Different ways of looking at this but it works. If you build your tempt to where you need it before staging, then you are there. I do understand the moisture problem. I have been employed all my life in Florida to fight moisture, in many ways. This is another concept. I have 3 other ideas that includes moisture control and HP//// I have been going to the track before a/c in cars at the track.
makes sense
 

Hickster

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Me also. I worked at the Cape for 15 years attempting to figure out the reflecting solar panels. Oh, and sorry to say we worked on the SRBC before the dis ass ter.
 

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I'm done till the chiller comes in, in the meantime I'm going to do a compresson test and make sure the engine is still healthy.
A compression test is better then no test but your best bet is a leak down test as it will reveal even small cylinder sealing issues. A stock Hellcat engine will have very low leak down, like 1/2 to 1% even cold at 100 psi test pressure. With your IAT’s getting as high as they do your pistons are getting pretty hot which leads to allot of ring expansion, these engines are built with pretty small top ring gap which doesn’t allow much room for overheating before they butt. A Leak down test is the gold standard in cylinder sealing testing. A compression test won’t pick up 2-3% difference in leak down. A leak down test is something good to do even to an engine not giving any issues as knowing leak down figures for your engine and keeping track of them let’s you see a problem before it gets too out of hand causing even more costly repair when it finds you not you find it first. Excess blow by the rings gets them even hotter quicker which leads to ring butting even quicker. I think Speedy will even agree with me here, he knows where I’m coming from what ring butting can lead too.

You run a passenger side catch can? If yes what is it’s contents like after a track session? It’s good to start with a clean shiny can and see what it collects after a flogging at the track, good sealing will at hot engine temps will produce next to nothing in the catch can on a tight engine making very little blow by.

I agree with Speedy with Knock sensor 2 seeing the most noise, and it’s cyclical like it being generated by only a piston or 2 close together in the firing order, like 2 and 7 which are notorious for ring issues. Do a leak down test, it will tell you if you have damaged rings or not.
 

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Just a thought...why not swap your #2 sensor with one of the others and see if the knock follows ? If it does, you know it's a bad sensor, if not then problem is somewhere near sensor as described above.
 

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Yeah I've been under the car left and right, nothing is near the sensor, nothing is mechanically loose. How can you tell if the knock sensor has gone bad? With the dual pump setup, there is no basket, so a quarter tank might as well be empty. The sock does some work but not enough. So there is temperature and sucking air to fight.



I am going that way with the HX bypass, I want a switch to flip when in race mode so I don't have to run the AC.



I use cooldown mode with the Tazer and have fans. Still because of the way any track in Maryland works, you idle for a long time. Also even in the Summer every track is packed. How can you tell if you have a bad sensor?

I'm done till the chiller comes in, in the meantime I'm going to do a compresson test and make sure the engine is still healthy.
My friends car was showing 0 v's when it was bad & replaced.

With a ic bypass valve like on mine, in hot weather, it will get down to 37* to 39* b4 burnout, after burnout it's around mid to low 40*s, after pass at the end it's at 80*, by the time I drive back to staging lanes it's back down to 39* > 40*.
But still if running back to back passes or idling too long will heat soak engine & not run it's best vs being cooled down, I try to not idle more than 15 min. b4 pass if I can help it.
A 2 gallon reservoir tank would help keep ic temps down through out the pass, but also take longer to chill it down too with more water to chill. So there's some give & take on my setup but it's still better than without it, ic temps at the end of pass will still be at ambient temp or less on hot days. I have seen 28* ic temps b4 burnout on cold days.

A/C does shut off automatically when you go WOT, no need to be turning it on & off, turn on & leave it, does not drip on track, never had issue with track personal or do they even know.
And when I don't need a/c or not at track, I can leave it off & factory cool ic with stock HX's.
Is this setup the absolute best that it could be ? NO, but it's a street car that likes to go to the track, best of both worlds to me.
 
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