The 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon is promising to be leaner and meaner than its Hellcat counterpart, according to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.

The company on Thursday said the recently announced Demon - set to debut in April - will be more than 200 pounds lighter than the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, which tips the scales at nearly 4,500 pounds.

Based on a second teaser video released by Dodge on Thursday, "adjustments" have been made to the wheels, steering, suspension, brakes, interior construction and components to take weight out.

The weight reduction announcement comes a week after Dodge said the Demon would be a "next Hellcat" that is "raising the bar again" for muscle cars.

Dodge boss Tim Kuniskis, head of Fiat Chrysler's passenger car brands for North America, recently declined to provide specifics on the car to The Detroit News. He said videos with details of the car will be released weekly heading up to the car's unveiling for the New York International Auto Show.

The second teaser video was posted by Dodge on Thursday to ifyouknowyouknow.com, a microsite the brand created for the car. There will be 12 teaser videos in all.

In the first video, "Cage," an animated Hellcat "transforms, thus beginning a new chapter in the Dodge brand's performance legacy."

The Challenger SRT Demon will go on sale alongside the Hellcat SRT Challenger and Charger models, which will continue for the 2018 model year, Kuniskis said. He declined to say if there will be a Charger SRT Demon.

The $65,000-plus Hellcat models have served as muscle-car halos for the Dodge brand since being announced in 2014, even though they represent a relatively small slice of sales. The cars are powered by a supercharged 6.2-liter Hemi V-8 engine that produces 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque.

The rollout of the Demon is the opposite of what the company did with the Dodge Challenger Hellcat SRT: The Hellcat was unveiled and then details were released in the run-up to when they hit showrooms. By the time the Demon is shown, motorheads should know everything - engine, performance, pricing, etc. - according to Kuniskis.

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